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“True goals are products of an individual’s belief system.  A true goal is something that you absolutely believe you can and will accomplish.  It is more than something you write down, something you hope you can reach, or something a coach or a parent wants you to do.  A true goal is something you know you will accomplish.

            A true goal is so much a part of your core belief system that it affects every activity you do that is even remotely related to that goal.  It keeps you from doing anything that might hinder your success.  It allows you to act, to train, and to compete as if you cannot fail.  Your belief system cannot conceive of failure; it will not let you fall short of your goal.  A true goal is not just a wish or a hope.  A true goal will be accomplished.  Believe in belief.

            Most people sell themselves short.  Most of us have to wait for someone else to prove to us that something can be accomplished.  We need permission.  The greatest athletes, and for that matter, the greatest innovators in any field, say, “This will surely be done in the future; why can’t I be the one to do it now?”  They do not need permission to accomplish feats that others think are unbelievable or impossible.  Their belief systems are so strong that what seems extraordinary to most people seems attainable to them.

            By far, the most important thing to believe in is yourself.  True belief in yourself allows you to act as if you cannot fail.  However, sometimes circumstances beyond your control will prevent you from accomplishing your goals, no matter how much you believe in them.  This is disappointing, but not devastating.  True belief in yourself means that your self-worth is not dependant upon your accomplishments or your possessions.

            Belief in yourself and in the possibility of success is the most important requirement for living an extraordinary life.  Believe in belief.  Believe in yourself and the best of the world will come to you.  Don’t sell yourself short.  You do not need permission to do the extraordinary.”

~~~ Richard Quick

 

It's all about "THE DUCK!"




NWSC Relay Meet 12/07/2013 Results 

12/11/2014 Champlin Park vs. Osseo Home   
Duck Awards:
     Top point scorer

      
12/18/2014 Blaine vs Osseo Home
Duck Awards:
      Top point scorer
      Great

12/27/2013 St. Louis Park vs Osseo Home
Duck Awards:
      Top point scorer
        

1/3/2015 Maroon and Gold Invite @ U of M
Duck Awards:
     Top point scorer
     Great ________ 

1/6/2015 Elk River vs Osseo Away
Duck Awards:
    Top point scorer
     

1/8/2015 Coon Rapids vs. Osseo Away
Duck Awards:
     Top point scorer
     Great ________ 

1/15/2015 Anoka vs. Osseo Home
Duck Awards:
     Top point scorer
     Great ________ 

1/17/2015 True Team Section Meet Results
Duck Awards:
     Top point scorer
     Great ________ 

1/29/2015 Park Center vs. Osseo Home
Duck Awards:
     Top point scorer
     Great ________ 

2/5/2015 Cross Over Conference Meet vs Blaine Away
Duck Awards:
     Top point scorer
     Great ________ 

2/14/2015 JV Conference Meet Results

2015 Varsity Section 5AA Meet Results - Prelims

2015 Varsity Section 5AA Meet Results - Finals

2014 Minnesota State AA Meet Results 

Schools now being rated on Sportsmanship!

Beginning with the current fall season, schools are being rated on sportsmanship. Game officials have the opportunity to rate the sportsmanship of players, coaches and fans after each game that they work. They also have the opportunity to rate schools on their site management and “game” personnel (PA, scorekeepers, timers, etc).

 The rating guidelines are as follows:

Spectators, Participants and Coaches:

  • Excellent (5) - Sportsmanship and behavior were exemplary - absolutely no problems. This was an exceptional officiating experience.

  • Good (4) - Overall sportsmanship and behavior was very good. This was a pleasurable officiating experience.

  • Acceptable (3) - Sportsmanship and behavior was generally good. There were some minor problems. This was an average officiating experience.

  • Needs Improvement (2) - There were several problems with sportsmanship and/or behavior. Improvement is needed. This was a disappointing officiating experience.

  • Unacceptable (1) - Sportsmanship and/or behavior was poor - there were issues that must be addressed. An MSHSL Incident Report Form has been filed. This was not an enjoyable officiating experience.

  • N/A - Not applicable

Site Management and Game Personnel:

  • Excellent (5) - Welcomed by school staff, facilities for officials available and prepared, site management available & helpful throughout the contest. Game personnel were well-prepared and knowledgeable; good communication.

  • Good (4) - Greeted by school staff, facilities for officials available, site management available when needed. Game personnel were knowledgeable and cooperative.

  • Acceptable (3) - Greeted upon arrival, facilities available, but not prepared, site management present most of the time. Game personnel were acceptable.

  • Needs Improvement (2) - Not greeted, facilities not prepared, site management not available or helpful. Game personnel were not prepared - led to minor problems.

  • Unacceptable (1) - Not greeted, no facilities available, no site manager. Game personnel were not prepared or available - problems with game personnel

  • NA - Not Applicable

There is also a space for comments.

Schools will not receive reports after every game, but will be notified with composite scores approximately every two weeks. Schools can then use this information both to reinforce positive behavior, and to take action that will correct problems.

When there are serious problems, officials will fill out incident report forms, as in the past. That will allow the MSHSL office to work with schools in a timely fashion to apply appropriate consequences, and take action necessary to correct problems.

Sportsmanship and citizenship are cornerstones of our educational activities program. These areas need constant attention. This new rating system will be of assistance to schools as they work with their students, coaches and communities on these core values. 

By Kevin Merkle, Associate Director
MSHSL Fall 2007 Bulletin


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